I’m Gender-Fluid. Vogue, Got a Minute to Talk About This New Cover? | Cosmopolitan – FDSC
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I’m Gender-Fluid. Vogue, Got a Minute to Talk About This New Cover? | Cosmopolitan

I’m Gender-Fluid. Vogue, Got a Minute to Talk About This New Cover? | Cosmopolitan

Written by Jacob Tobia for Cosmopolitan
July 14, 2017

It’s simple, really: If you’re going to talk about a marginalized community, talk to that community.

First things first: I could look at a Zayn Malik in an Alexander McQueen peacock-print suit literally forever; I want to see Gigi Hadid in bright red, oversize Dries Van Noten tailoring every. Damn. Day. It is an indisputable fact that the looks sported by Zayn and Gigi (and younger brother Anwar Hadid) for August’s Vogue are fire. The shoot is exquisite. The styling, divine.

The gender politics? Not so much.

Because rather than just position Zayn and Gigi as #RelationshipGoals, Vogue is labeling them as #GenderfluidGoals, and that’s a problem — one that’s already seen a major backlash on social media. Yes, it’s great that Zayn, Gigi, and Anwar are comfortable with gender fluidity, at least conceptually. Zayn sometimes wears Gigi’s T-shirts; “so what? It doesn’t matter if it was made for a girl,” he tells Vogue. “It’s not about gender … it’s about, like, shapes,” Gigi adds. That they dabble in each other’s closets and swap clothes is adorable; I, for one, would kill for access to either of their wardrobes. And, sure, it’s wonderful that they are in touch with their gender as a site of self-expression — by normalizing gender fluidity as something that a straight cisgender couple can engage with, the article could’ve actually been fairly radical.

Read more at Cosmopolitan.com.

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